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1863 March 4 and 7: News About Area Soldiers and Other Local News Items

March 10, 2013

From the March 4, 1863, issue of The Prescott Journal and the March 7, 1863, issue of The Polk County Press.

From The Prescott Journal:

EDITOR JOURNAL :—To-day we have had a shake hands with our old friend J. D. Brown, a member of the 20th Reg. Wis. Vols.  Sergeant J. D. looks well, and he gives a good account of the 20th, and speaks well of its officers—especially of Col. Starr.  He gave also a good account of the Reg. at the battle of Prairie Grove, Ark.  He says men could do no more than was done there.  There was no flinching, no skulking.  Every man stood up to the work like old veterans of  ’76.¹
T., Ellsworth, Feb. 26 1863.

Finger copyA letter from Capt. Maxon [sic] brings the news that there is but little doubt, but Joseph Copp,² son of Hon. Wm. Copp, of Clifton has been hung by the guerrullas [sic].

Finger copy The Madison Journal thus speaks of Chaplin GREEN of the 30th:

“Mr. GREEN was formerly a steamboat captain on the Mississippi, and while he is truly a christian gentleman, he has by no means lost the keen insight into human nature which his former position gave him.”

ARRESTED.—Lieut. E. L. Buttrick,³ of the Thirty-First Regiment, on the of the parties engaged in the late arrests at Racine, (at the order of Col. Messmore) was yesterday morning arrested at the instance of Mr. Jared Thompson, Jr. (first arrested by Buttrick,) of this city, and held to bail in the sum of $10,000 to answer charges to be preferred against him.  He gave the required bail.

Finger copy HOSPITAL.—The State Journal thus describes the new hospital at Camp Randall:

—The main hospital building is 440 feet in length, including two wings.  The main part and the wings are each 22 feet in width.—Each wing has a ward, and the main part of the building is divided into two wards.—There are now about 150 bunks placed in their proper position in the hospital, and there is sufficient room to accommodate 50 more.  The walls of the entire structure are substantially built of inch boards placed upright, and batened [sic] both inside and out.  Ample arrangements for ventilation are made in the roof.  Each ward is heated by two large stoves, the pipes of which are extended overhead the entire length of the room, and the temperature kept up is equable and agreeable.  The kitchen arrangements are ample, and seem to be particularly well adapted to the ends sought.

Finger copy JOHN L. DALE, Sutler 30th [Wisconsin Infantry], returned home last week, and will remain a few weeks.  He reports the health of the 30th is good.

A GOOD CHANCE TO SECURE HOMESTEADS.—By a recent decision at the General Land Office at Washington, nearly all the well known Fox and Wisconsin Improvement Lands in this county [Pierce] except the odd numbered sections reserved for railroads, have been restored to market.  All the even numbered sections in township 26 range 15 are therefore subject to entry.  These lands are as fine timbered lands as any in the world ;  the timber consists of sugar maple rock, red and swamp elm, basswood, oak, butternut, etc. ;  soil well adapted to the cultivation of all sorts of root crops and cereals raised on the prairies, and a sure thing on winter wheat.  This section is also well watered by creeks and springs.

Parties wishing timber farms can now get as fine locations as could be desired, within twelve to twenty miles of the County Seat, by purchase from the Government, or by settlement under the provisions of the Homestead Law.

From The Polk County Press:

Lieut. Frank H. Pratt, 7th Minnesota Regiment is at Taylors Falls, on a short visit.  Lieutenant Pratt has been quite sick with diptheria [sic], but is now gaining his usual health.  He returns to Mankato, in a few days.

We understand that counterfeit $5 U. S. Treasury Notes are in circulation in this vicinity.  While at Taylor Falls this week, we were informed that Elder Reynolds, Receiver at the St. Croix Land Office had taken a few by mistake, and had succeeded in detecting them.  We would suggest to our people to be on the lookout for them.

— Union meetings are being held all over the country, and great enthusiasm prevails.  At Cincinnati, Indianapolis, Chicago, Louisville, St. Louis and several other cities, Union meetings and leagues are in full blast.  At Cincinnati, recently, a Democratic Club, and several Republican Clubs adjourned in a body to a Union League, and enrolled their names with the union party.  This is the right spirit.  Let party drop and “all lend a hand to work ship,” and help crush this rebellion.

BALL AT HUDSON.—On Wednesday evening last, together with eight couple[s] from this place, we attended the Union Ball at Hudson.  We cannot say too much in praise of the party, the Hudson “boys,” and the landlord of the City Hotel.  The “boys” done the “fair thing by Osceola,” and so did “Uncle” Anderson of the “City.”

1.  Company A of the 20th Wisconsin Infantry was composed of mainly of men from Pierce County. Joshua D. Brown was from Maiden Rock. Lieutenant Colonel Henry A. Starr was from Milwaukee.
2.  Joseph M. Copp was a corporal in Company A of the 12th Wisconsin Infantry, the Lyon Light Guards. He was a prisoner in Atlanta, not hanged, and will be mustered out in January 1865.
3.  Edward K. Buttrick, from Milwaukee, was the captain of Company H of the 31st Wisconsin Infantry. He is the only man with the surname Buttrick in the 31st. The arrests in Racine probably refers to draftees being arrested for not showing up at the draft rendezvous in Racine, which the 31st was in charge of guarding.

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