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1863 June 27: The Battle of Richmond in Louisiana

July 2, 2013

There is not a whole lot of news related to the Civil War in either The Prescott Journal or The Polk County Press of June 27, 1863, and what there is we have already published except for this little piece.  The following is from The Polk County Press.

We haven’t heard about Milliken’s Bend before now.  Milliken’s Bend in the Mississippi River is 15 miles northwest of Vicksburg and had supply depots and hospitals.  The relatively small Battle of Milliken’s Bend had taken place on June 7, 1863.

What is mentioned here in the third paragraph is actually the Battle of Richmond (Louisiana), which took place on June 15, 1863.  “Col. Moore” is a combination of Brigadier General Joseph A. Mower and Colonel Lucias F. Hubbard¹ of the 5th Minnesota Infantry.  The Union victory deprived Vicksburg of yet another supply route from Louisiana farmlands.

FROM VICKSBURG.

MEMPHIS, June 21st, via CAIRO, 23d.—The stermer [sic] Luminary, from Chickasaw Bayou, with official reports from Grant [Ulysses S. Grant] to the 18th, arrived to-day.

The enemy kept up steady fire from heavy artillery, but accomplished nothing, scarcely a man was injured on our side.

Col. Moore in command at Milliken’s Bend made an expedition to Richmond, La., drove the rebels from that section, burned the town and brought women and children to Milken’s [sic] Bend.

It is stated positively that the rebels carried a black flag, with Skull and Crossbones, in the recent attack on Milliken’s Bend.

Johnston’s forces [Joseph E. Johnston] are moving towards Yazoo city.  He will find Grant ready to receive him.

1.  Lucias Frederick Hubbard (1836-1913) was an Easterner who moved west to seek his fortune, served with distinction in the Civil War, and became the 9th governor of the State of Minnesota (1882-1887). He joined the 5th Minnesota Infantry in 1861 as a private and became colonel of the 5th Minnesota on August 31, 1862. He fought at the Siege of Corinth, the Siege of Vicksburg, the Battle of Nashville, and the Battle of Fort Blakely.

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