Skip to content

1865 May 27: Tidbits on the Sultana Disaster, Jefferson Davis, the Milwaukee Soldiers Home, and More

June 2, 2015

Following are the smaller items from the May 27, 1865, issues of The Polk County Press and The Prescott Journal.

From The Polk County Press:

OMISSION.—Owing to our being unable to procure paper upon which to print our paper last week, we omitted the issue entirely.  Our subscribers, however, are not to be the losers, as we shall furnish all with 52 copies for a year.

THE SULTANA DISASTER.—It is understood that the commission to investigate the destruction of the Sultana, and the terrible loss of life connected therewith, find that the disaster was caused solely from the fact that the boilers were defective and the water too low.

COTTON IN THE SOUTHWEST.—An order has been issued by Gen. Canby [Edward Canby] claiming for the United States all cotton to which the “Confederate Government” had any claim, in the territory embraced in Dick Taylor’s surrender [Richard Taylor].

— The rebel forces in north Georgia have surrendered on the terms granted to Gen. Lee.  [Robert E. Lee]

— Troops whose terms of enlistment expires before October will be mustered out of the service as soon as possible.

THE RELEASE OF PRISONERS.—An order has been issued from the War Department, that all prisoners of war, except officers above the rank of Colonel, who, before the capture of Richmond, signified their desire to take the oath of allegiance to the United States and their unwillingness to be exchanged, be forthwith released on their taking said oath, and transportation furnished to their respective homes.  In respect to all other prisoners of war, further orders will be issued.

RETURNING.—Most of the men furnished by the towns of Alden and Lincoln, to fill their quotas under the last call, have been discharged, and have returned home.  The boys made a good thing by enlisting and we are glad that the necessity which called them to don the blue coat, and exchange the plow for the musket has passed away.  Long live the Republic !

FAIR AT MILWAUKEE.—On the 28th of June, a great Fair will open at Milwaukee, the proceeds to be devoted to the endowment of a soldier’s home in that city.  The Legislature has made an appropriation in behalf of this enterprise, and the people throughout the State are moving earnestly in the matter, and will doubtless make it a success.  We hope the ladies of Osceola are doing all they can to further the good cause.

— The person who for two years was purser of the pirate Alabama has been appointed to a first class clerkship in the Land Office at Washington.  This position with a good salary, has been given him by the Government that it may have his testimony available as to the captures and destruction committed by that corsair.

— At Arlington, Vermont, a young Cobpperhead [sic] was expressing his satisfaction at Mr. Lincoln’s murder, when a physician suddenly clapped over his mouth a large sticking plaster, which he had been quietly warming on the stove, and thus effectually stopped the flow of treasonable sentiments.

— The Confederate President [Jefferson Davis], in using wife dresses, must evidently have been reduced to his last shift.

— Jeff. Davis is to be tried for high treason by the civil courts.  President Johnson [Andrew Johnson] will give him the full benefit of the law.

— In a speech made by Jeff. Davis on the return of the Peace Commissioners from Fortress Monroe, and which was filled with sound fury, he said, amongst other things that “he thanked God he was the representative of a race too proud to bend the knee to mortal man.”

Alas, how fallen !  This haughty “representative” is now so humble and so meek, that he attempted to make himself out a woman !  Chivalry in petticoats and crinoline !  Mrs. Jeff. it appears, could not believe this herself of “the expiring blood of Lancaster,” for she exclaimed to the captors of the petticoat representative, “Take care gentlemen, or he may hurt somebody !”—Chicago Journal.

— The Chicago “Journal” proposes that the authorities of the different States shall at once declare that the confederate uniform be henceforth the garb of all convicts sentenced to the State Penitentiaries for ordinary crimes, and that the uniform worn by confederate officers be that for criminals of higher grade, according to degree.

— The President [Andrew Johnson] will soon issue a proclamation declaring all vessels under the rebel flag pirates, and to be treated as such.

— There is a Pennsylvania soldier who has lost both arms, both legs, and one eye, and remains alive to tell the story.

— The key of Castle Thunder, the notorious rebel prison at Richmond is in New York, and is to be sold at auction for the benefit of orphans of volunteers.

— The first meeting of the society for the abolition of slavery in the Spanish colonies took place at Madrid on the 2d ult., and was a large and enthusiastic one.  Senior Plozza was elected President.

— The national flag was torn down from the Post office, in Highland, Iowa County, on the 17th inst., and thrown into the street.  That town sent one volunteer to the war, under the first half million call.  It is far more secesh than half the South.

— Only some $15,000,000 of the most rebel loan, placed on the English market two years ago, has ever been disposed of.  We wish it had been more, so that the English sympathizers with rebellion would feel their loss.

— The abolition amendment of the Constitution has been ratified by twenty-one States.  Of the free States, New Hampshire, Connecticut, California, Iowa and Oregon have not yet acted on it.  These, with one State more, will be sufficient to secure its adoption.

— The last story about the disposition of the body of President Lincoln’s assassin is that Booth’s head and heart have been placed in the army medical museum, and that the remainder of his body has been interred in a spot devoted to the burial of felons, such precautions being taken as to prevent any public knowledge of the spot.  [Abraham Lincoln; John Wilkes Booth]

From The Prescott Journal:

HOW JEFF. DAVIS SHOULD BE TREATED.—In regard to the treatment of JEFF. DAVIS, we may ask in the very word which DAVIS himself used in the Senate of the United States, when speaking of JOHN BROWN.

“Who would seek to dull the sword of justice in favor of him whose crime connects with all that is most abhorrent to humanity, the violation of every obligation to the social compact, the laws, the Constitution, the requirements of public virtue and personal honor !”

—The whirligig of time has made some queer changes during the past few years.  Five years ago, ANDREW JOHNSON voted for JOHN C. BRECKINRIDGE for President ;  now he is President himself, and will hang BRECKINRIDGE if he can catch him.

— In a speech made by Jeff. Davis on the return of the Peace Commissioners from Fortress Monroe, and which was filled with sound fury, he said, amongst other things that “he thanked God he was the representative of a race too proud to bend the knee to mortal man.”

Alas, how fallen!  This haughty “representative” is now so humble and so meek, that he attempted to make himself out a woman !  Chivalry in petticoats and crinoline !  Mrs. Jeff. it appears, could not believe this herself of “the expiring blood of Lancaster,” for she exclaimed to the captors of the petticoat representative, “Take care gentlemen, or he may hurt somebody !”—Chicago Journal.

— New York Times, says:

“The archives of the Cabinet and government and the recollections of Cabinet ministers will prove, that from the beginning to the “bitter end” Gov. Seward [William H. Seward] originated the strongest measures, advocated the largest armies, and urged the most stringent policy against the rebellion ;  that on no occasion, in the cabinet, in his department, or in his personal relations with the President, Congress or the people has he faltered or wavered ;  that his moral and physical courage has been ever conspicuous, and that he has given his time, his talents, his fortune and almost his life, to his country.”

THE SULTANA DISASTER.—A correspondent of the Tribune, writing from Memphis, says it is conjectured that some hundreds of victims of the disaster on the steamer Sultana were burned to death, having been caught under the ruins of the upper works.  This conjecture is made almost certain by the statement of the pilot, who states that while the wreck was burning he could hear many persons underneath struggling and crying for help.  Some of them succeeded in extricating themselves and jumping overboard, but it is feared that a great many had not the desired alternative of choseing [sic] the less horrible of the two deaths, and were consumed.

No comments yet

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: